2000w INVERTER | 200-400Ah Lithium | 200 TO 700W SOLAR Camper Wiring Diagram

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This wiring diagram will show you everything you need to know about installing the core elements of a high-end camper solar electric setup. This system features a 2000 watt inverter, can handle MANY different configurations of solar panel arrays up to 700 watts with no changes to the core wiring of this diagram, and allows for charging from the alternator as well as shore power. This is a long read and if you have questions, drop them in the comments below or if you feel you need additional guidance, you can set up a call with me: CLICK HERE for more info.

History of Changes to this Page (Click to Expand)

Post Published August 10, 2020

DIY Camper Van Wiring Diagram

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE THE HI-RES PRINTABLE PDF OF THIS DIAGRAM

A Note about Quantities

For the ‘Quantities’ in the below shopping list, each singular component is listed a quanty per each, wire is listed a quantity of feet, and heat shrink is listed as qty 1 = 2.25″.

For Example:

Qty 1 – Inverter Charger means you need to purchase 1 Inverter Charger

Qty 3 – 4/0 Wire means you need 3 feet of 4/0 wire. This may mean you need to buy 5ft from the product page

Qty 5 heat shrink means you need 5 pieces of 2.25″ heat shrink. This means you’ll need 5 x 2.25″ pieces of heat shrink for a total of 11.25″ of heat shrink.

Qty 8 – 2/0 x 5/16″ Wire lugs means you need 8 wire lugs… not 8 packs of wire lugs.

Camper Solar PARTS shopping list

ProductQtyLink
1/2" Black Heat Shrink10
1/2" Red Heat Shrink6
1/4" Black Heat Shrink6
10 AWG Ferrule6
10/3 Wire10
100 Amp MEGA Fuse1
100Ah Battle Born Lithium Batteries4
2/0 Black Wire25
2/0 Red Wire15
2/0 x 3/8" Wire Lug2
2/0 x 5/16" Wire Lug24
2000W Victron Multiplus 12V1
3/4" Black Heat Shrink14
3/4" Red Heat Shrink12
30 Amp Shore Power Cord1
30 Amp Shore Power Outlet1
300 Amp ANL Fuse1
300 Amp MEGA Fuse1
50 Amp MEGA Fuse1
50A Square D HOM AC Breaker1
6 AWG Black Wire31
6 AWG Ferrule11
6 AWG Red Wire30
6 AWG x 5/16" Wire Lug5
6/3 Wire10
60 Amp Terminal Fuse1
ANL Fuse Holder1
Lynx Adapter2
Master Disconnect1
Victron BMV-712 Battery Monitor1
Victron Lynx Distributor1
Victron Orion Smart 12|12 - 30A1
WFCO AC-DC Distribution Panel1

Camper Solar PARTS detail

The section below will tell you where each of the parts from above fits into the wiring diagram. This is quite lengthy, but if you are having trouble seeing the diagram or just want more clarification that the diagram above doesn’t deliver, hopefully this will help:

Column AColumn BColumn C

Battery Bank Wiring

This section contains all of the parts necessary to wire the battery bank together. These products include the batteries as well as the related wiring parts that you will need to make the battery to battery connections.
ProductQtyLink
100Ah Battle Born Lithium Batteries4
2/0 Red Wire5
2/0 Black Wire5
2/0 x 5/16" Wire Lug12
3/4" Red Heat Shrink6
3/4" Black Heat Shrink6

Battery Bank to Busbars

This section contains all of the parts necessary to wire the battery bank to the main DC distribution busbar. The busbar itself as well as the shunt for the battery monitor and fuse mounted inside to the busbar protecting the positive wire from overcurrent can be found in this section. The busbar is essentially an extension of the battery terminals and allows you to deliver power where it needs to go and houses the fuses necessary to protect the wires leaving the busbar. The Battery monitor allows you to know how full your batteries are, know how much power you are actively gaining or losing, and see the historical data of your power usage.
ProductQtyLink
Victron Lynx Distributor1
Victron BMV-712 Battery Monitor1
2/0 Red Wire5
2/0 Black Wire5
2/0 x 5/16" Wire Lug4
2/0 x 3/8" Wire Lug2
3/4" Red Heat Shrink4
3/4" Black Heat Shrink2
300 Amp ANL Fuse1
ANL Fuse Holder1
Lynx Adapter2
Master Disconnect1

Busbar to Inverter/Charger

This section contains the Inverter Charger and all of the parts necessary to wire the Inverter Charger to the Positive and Negative busbars. The Inverter Charger allows you to re-charge your batteries from 'shore power' and also converts the 12v DC power stored in your batteries to 120V AC power like you'd find in your standard household wall outlet.
ProductQtyLink
2000W Victron Multiplus 12V1
2/0 Red Wire5
2/0 Black Wire5
2/0 Black Wire5
2/0 x 5/16" Wire Lug6
3/4" Red Heat Shrink2
3/4" Black Heat Shrink4
300 Amp MEGA Fuse1

Busbar to B2B Charger

This section contains the battery to battery charger as well as the wiring that you need to connect the battery to battery charger to the positive and negative busbars. This will allow you to charge your house battery bank from the engine alternator.
ProductQtyLink
Victron Orion Smart 12|12 - 30A1
6 AWG Red Wire5
6 AWG Black Wire5
6 AWG x 5/16" Wire Lug2
6 AWG Ferrule2
1/2" Red Heat Shrink2
1/2" Black Heat Shrink2
50 Amp MEGA Fuse1

B2B Charger to Alternator

This section contains all of the wiring necessary to connect the battery to battery charger to the starting battery. This will allow you to charge your house battery bank from the engine alternator.
ProductQtyLink
6 AWG Red Wire15
6 AWG Black Wire16
6 AWG x 5/16" Wire Lug1
6 AWG Ferrule1
1/2" Red Heat Shrink2
60 Amp Terminal Fuse1

Busbar to DC Fuse Block

This section contains the DC fuse block (which is inside of the AC-DC distribution panel) as well as the wires to connect it to the main DC distribution busbars. This will allow you to deliver power to the DC Fuse block for small branch circuits such as lights, fans, usb outlets, etc..
ProductQtyLink
WFCO AC-DC Distribution Panel1
6 AWG Red Wire10
6 AWG Black Wire10
6 AWG x 5/16" Wire Lug2
6 AWG Ferrule2
1/2" Red Heat Shrink2
1/2" Black Heat Shrink2
100 Amp MEGA Fuse1

Busbar to Chassis Ground

This section includes the parts necessary to allow you to ground your negative busbar to the chassis ground. The chassis ground will be connected to the negative busbar on one side and the other side can go to a factory chassis ground or simply anywhere good metal to metal contact can be made between the wire lug and the bare metal of the body or frame of the camper.
ProductQtyLink
2/0 Black Wire5
2/0 x 5/16" Wire Lug2
3/4" Black Heat Shrink2

Shore Power to Inverter/Charger

This section includes the exterior shore power outlet and shore power cord that allows you to plug your camper into shore power as well as all of the wiring that allows you to connect the exterior shore power cord to your inverter charger. This will allow you to not only use shore power for powering your devices but also allow you to charge your batteries from shore power. Note: 10/3 w/ ground wire you will find at your local hardware store will very likely have 4 wires in it, which is unnecessary. The link for 10/3 wire below has 3 wires inside, which is correct for the application.
ProductQtyLink
30 Amp Shore Power Outlet1
10/3 Wire10
10 AWG Ferrule6
1/4" Black Heat Shrink6
30 Amp Shore Power Cord1

Inverter Charger to AC Distribution

This section includes the wiring necessary to connect the inverter charger to the AC side of the AC-DC power distribution panel listed in an earlier section. A quick note... 6/3 stranded wire is used here because although our shore power is 30A max, which 10 gauge wire is adequate for, the PowerAssist function of the Victron Multiplus Inverter Charger can add up to 3000w of battery power to shore power in the event that more power than the shore power can provide is needed. This much power coming from the Inverter/Charger requires 6 gauge wire feeding a 50A main breaker in the AC distribution panel. Also... the 6/3 w/ ground wire you will find at your local hardware store will very likely have 4 wires in it, which is unnecessary. The link for 6/3 wire below has 3 wires inside, which is correct for the application.
ProductQtyLink
6/3 Wire10
6 AWG Ferrule6
1/2" Black Heat Shrink6
50A Square D HOM AC Breaker1

Choosing your Solar Panels & Charge Controller

The following section provides you with several different options for solar charging. The above parts list can remain completely unchanged and the diagram above can remain mostly unchanged except for the alterations noted by the diagrams below, but whatever solar array setup you choose below for your needs, these parts will need to be added to your shopping list. These are broken up by total solar wattage. As a general rule, you want to have twice as many watts of solar as you do amp hours of batteries. So, 300Ah Batteries = 600W solar. 400Ah Batteries = 800W solar. 600Ah Batteries = 1200W of solar. This is just a rule of thumb. Not a law.

400 Watts – 4x100W Solar Panels (Click to Expand)
Column AColumn BColumn C
This section contains all of the parts necessary to wire 4x100w solar panels into your camper electrical system as shown in the diagram above and must be added to the master shopping list at the top of this blog post. There are three options for solar panels in this list and they will all work well for this particular diagram. Choose your solar panels based on their physical dimensions and which ones work with your own specific setup. The dimensions are listed on their respective product pages. This solar array is managed by the Victron SmartSolar MPPT 100|30 and remaining products include the wires, solar disconnect breaker, solar disconnect breaker box, lugs, ferrules, heat shrink and everything else needed to make the full solar panel array to busbar assembly. This parts list does not include means to attach the solar panels to the roof as that veries GREATLY from install to install.
ProductQtyLink
100w Rich Solar Panels4
100w NewPowa Solar Panels4
100w Renogy Solar Panels4
Victron SmartSolar MPPT 100|301
10 AWG Red Wire30
10 AWG Black Wire30
MC4 Connectors6
2-to-1 MC4 Combiner1
Roof Entry Gland1
50A Solar Disconnect Breaker1
Din Rail Breaker Box1
10 AWG Ferrule6
6 AWG Ferrule2
6 AWG Red Wire2
6 AWG Black Wire4
6 AWG x 5/16" Wire Lug3
6 AWG x 1/4" Wire Lug1
1/4" Red Heat Shrink3
1/4" Black Heat Shrink3
1/2" Red Heat Shrink2
1/2" Black Heat Shrink4
50 Amp MEGA Fuse1
600 Watts – 6x100W Solar Panels (Click to Expand)
Column AColumn BColumn C
This section contains all of the parts necessary to wire 6x100w solar panels into your camper electrical system as shown in the diagram above and must be added to the master shopping list at the top of this blog post. There are three options for solar panels in this list and they will all work well for this particular diagram. Choose your solar panels based on their physical dimensions and which ones work with your own specific setup. The dimensions are listed on their respective product pages. This solar array is managed by the Victron SmartSolar MPPT 100|50 and remaining products include the wires, solar disconnect breaker, solar disconnect breaker box, lugs, ferrules, heat shrink and everything else needed to make the full solar panel array to busbar assembly. This parts list does not include means to attach the solar panels to the roof as that veries GREATLY from install to install.
ProductQtyLink
100w Rich Solar Panels4
100w NewPowa Solar Panels4
100w Renogy Solar Panels4
Victron SmartSolar MPPT 100|501
10 AWG Red Wire30
10 AWG Black Wire30
MC4 Connectors8
2-to-1 MC4 Combiner1
Roof Entry Gland1
50A Solar Disconnect Breaker1
Din Rail Breaker Box1
10 AWG Ferrule6
6 AWG Ferrule2
6 AWG Red Wire2
6 AWG Black Wire4
6 AWG x 5/16" Wire Lug3
6 AWG x 1/4" Wire Lug1
1/4" Red Heat Shrink3
1/4" Black Heat Shrink3
1/2" Red Heat Shrink2
1/2" Black Heat Shrink4
80 Amp MEGA Fuse1
600 Watts – 3x200W Solar Panels (Click to Expand)
Column AColumn BColumn C
This section contains all of the parts necessary to wire 3x200w solar panels into your camper electrical system as shown in the diagram above and must be added to the master shopping list at the top of this blog post. There are two options for solar panels in this list and they will all work well for this particular diagram. Choose your solar panels based on their physical dimensions and which ones work with your own specific setup. The dimensions are listed on their respective product pages. This solar array is managed by the Victron SmartSolar MPPT 100|50 and remaining products include the wires, solar disconnect breaker, solar disconnect breaker box, lugs, ferrules, heat shrink and everything else needed to make the full solar panel array to busbar assembly. This parts list does not include means to attach the solar panels to the roof as that veries GREATLY from install to install.
ProductQtyLink
200w Rich Solar Panels3
200w NewPowa Solar Panels3
Victron SmartSolar MPPT 100|501
10 AWG Red Wire30
10 AWG Black Wire30
MC4 Connectors4
Roof Entry Gland1
50A Solar Disconnect Breaker1
Din Rail Breaker Box1
10 AWG Ferrule6
6 AWG Ferrule2
6 AWG Red Wire2
6 AWG Black Wire4
6 AWG x 5/16" Wire Lug3
6 AWG x 1/4" Wire Lug1
1/4" Red Heat Shrink3
1/4" Black Heat Shrink3
1/2" Red Heat Shrink2
1/2" Black Heat Shrink4
80 Amp MEGA Fuse1

51 thoughts on “2000w INVERTER | 200-400Ah Lithium | 200 TO 700W SOLAR Camper Wiring Diagram”

  1. Thanks for the updates Nate! I’m about to embark on electrical so this couldn’t have come at a better time! As always, great work.

  2. I’ve been following you for years and have used your Solar design in building my 2013 sprinter. I was not totally convinced on the lithium battery isolator in your early design and I left out of my build and went with the sterling dc to dc charge works great.
    Thanks again for article.

  3. First of all, great resource, thanks for having great succinct info!

    I see that you don’t have any panels linked that are over 200 watts. Is there a reason for that? I’m looking at 2 270watt panels (I can’t seem to find many 300 watt panels that aren’t sold in groups of 5-10) and pair them with a 300 amp lithium battery bank in order to keep thing a little more affordable and save some roof top space. We also have a Jackery explorer 500 that we already own.

    So my questions are…
    -Should I be wary of panels over 200watts and if so why?
    -I know 540 watts of panel power is not technically enough for the 300 amp bank rule of thumb wise but would it be passable.
    -And lastly do you have a suggestion for how to use the jackery to support our system?

    1. 1: 270w panels are perfectly fine.

      2: I can’t say for sure as that will depend on your power consumption. If you are worries, plan to charge by the alternator and carry a backup generator.

      3: Use the Jackery totally seperately. Incorporating it will handicap your system.

  4. Hey guys,
    Your diagrams have been super helpful. I was finally getting ready to pull the trigger on the main electrical parts, and noticed your most recent upgraded diagram uses some new/different products. Obviously you consider it an upgrade or you wouldnt have published it, but to confirm- you feel like the orion 12/12-30 is superior to the $320 sterling and the lynx is a worthwhile upgrade from a simple bus bar? Is the advantage of the lynx the battery to battery fused protection? your old BB package was $3633 with 2- 100Ah batts, and the new schematic totals about $3974. Looks like no package deal for the latter. Is it worth the additional $340 with slightly downgraded charge controller? Also in the old package, why do you need the VE dongle with bluetooth enabled bmv-712? sorry, a lot of questions! FYI planning on 320W PV w/ 200Ah…You’re welcome here in Bend if youre ever through. Cheers, Dave

    1. I do feel the Orion is superior to the Sterling. Keeping all of the main components in the Victron ecosystem will allow for more seamless firmware updates when victron pushes those out to allow future features such as, say, combined charging from solar and alternator.

      For the Lynx vs the DIY busbar… See the ‘History of changes to this page’ description on this page for an explanation: https://www.explorist.life/3000w-inverter-400-600ah-400-to-1200w-solar-camper-solar-kit

      1. Thanks for the response Nate!…so your most recent diagram has the disconnect between the batteries and the positive bus. Previously you had it set up so the charge controller was on the battery side of the switch and was not disconnected by the switch. I believe you mentioned this was so batteries could continue to be charged in storage when the switch was off. Did you change your mind about this? How about keeping the charge controller on the battery side of the switch and having an additional disconnect between the charge controller and the battery?

        1. I did not necessarily change my mind about this, but that ‘reason’ is not a really big reason. Since the Victron Lynx came out, the way shown now is just simply easier to wire and having the charge controller on the battery side of the shutoff is not that big of a deal.

  5. I am thinking about doing a dual battery system with the charging from 1140w solar (6 190w panels) to 400ah 24v battery bank with alternator connected with a battery charger and isolator switch. This bank I am considering either connecting to a 600ah 12v battery bank via a solar charge controller (or something else… Still looking to limit the min/max voltage for input from the 24v bank in-between the 24v bank and 12v bank which will connect to the 3000w 12v pure sine inverter to handle the load of everything I plan on using…
    I might skip the 12v bank and just increase 24v batteries to 800ah. The panels each pull 6a current at 26v and have 60a charge controller for it, I am doing this on a 95 Dodge B3500 hightop van.
    I have bought all but the batteries, wires, monitors, and whatever you call the piece that allows you to regulate the min/max limits of voltage with a cutoff if outside those limits (I want to make sure my batteries stay at half or above).
    Your help would be very much appreciated and this could be a neat project for you 😉.

  6. awesome diagram with all the details needed to complete such a project
    I picked up most of these items from battle born recently.
    I mainly have one question that may be obvious to most but it’s just not totally clear to me, I am wondering what the ideal breaker situation is for the Ac in and out of the multiplus 12/2000 is?
    I see in the manual it says to use a 50a breaker on the Ac in line (from shore power) is this what you would reccomed?
    And as far as the Ac out (Inverter power) I am wondering what kind of brakers are reccomeded for use with this?

    Cheers! 🍻

    1. No breaker is needed for the AC in as per my diagram because the breaker is housed inside the shore power pedestal at the campground. So, it’s already in place, but it’s not something you need to build into your system.

      For the AC output, I recommend a 50A breaker installed into the breaker box as per the parts list on this page. This will handle 30A shore power plus the additional 2000w of PowerAssist from the Victron Multiplus.

  7. Hi! I just starting my van build. I’ve excised my power is the first thing to install before I get the walls put up. I’ve ordere all of my equipment, but I didn’t order a master shut off. Is this necessary ? I order the panel your recommended. I won’t have my inverter for a while but I’m mostly using DC to power everything already. I’m installing 2, 100 watt panels and with a 200ah agm battery to start. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

  8. I first want to say your diagrams are top notch. Really lays things out very well.

    My question is, as long as everything is taken in to consideration (such as MPPT controller specs etc) what are the pros and cons of using 24volt vs 12volt solar panels for a 12volt battery bank? Also would there be any changes needed other than making sure the MPPT is correctly sized?

    Thanks so much

  9. Left a comment and it seems to have disappeared. Hopefully not double posting.

    Installing a system in a Sprinter T1N with 200 A alternator, 400W solar, 400Ah lithium, and Victron 2000W Multiplus. What are the advantages/disadvantages of the Victron Orion Smart 12|12 – 30A, compared to the Li BIM in the power coming from the alternator?
    Thanks

  10. Awesome systems and diagrams, I really appreciate the detail as getting a crash course as an electrician is a mind f***. I would like to do a 24V lithium Nissan Leaf system with solar, alternator power, and shore power options, but I want to protect the alternator and do it right. I’m trying to do as much research as I can myself so I don’t ask stupid questions, but there’s just so much to go through.

    1: They have step ups from 12 to 24V, but how do you know what amperage to get for the B2B charger

    2: As it connects to the battery, do you size the fuse to the alternator output?

    3: It sounds like both the Victron and Sterling options isolate automatically so they only run while the vehicle is running, but there is an isolated and non-isolated version of the Victron…Is there a way to install a switch without harming the system so you can choose only to use it on cloudy or rainy days, allowing the solar to work if you’re driving on a sunny day?

    4: It looks like your ‘on/off’ switch is just connected to the busbar, which is also connected to the solar, so that would turn everything off. What is that switch for? Just to shut everything down if the system catches on fire or something?

    5: Or would I just get the non-isolated Victron option, as it SOUNDS like you can just turn it on and off via bluetooth instead of automatically when the van starts?

    1. Is the amperage on the B2B how many Amps per hour you will get charge? Is it really worth it, then, if you’re trying to boost the charge on a 200-300Ah system?

      1. Yes, that is correct. And the ‘is it worth it’ is a pretty personal question you’ll have to decide for yourself. If you have PLENTY of solar, alternator charging MAY not be worth it; but it’s SUPER nice on cloudy days.

    2. 1: You can get whatever amperage of charge controller you like. The more amps, the faster the charge will be but the more strain it will put on your alternator. I spec the 30A Victron Orion into my diagrams.

      2: You size the wire and the fuse according to the amps that will be flowing through the wire. So, a 30A viction Orion DC-DC charger connected to a 12v battery bank will only have 30A @ 12v flowing through the wire. Size the wire and fuse off of this.

      3: Yes. Directions to install a switch are in the Victron Orion owners manual.

      4: It’s for system maintenance and/or seasonal storage.

      5: You could, indeed, do that as well.

  11. Hi Nate! Wondering why the breaker fuse size (60A) from the starter battery/alternator to the TR Smart is only 60A? I’ve seen a lot of people use 200A fuses on this path and the Promaster is putting out 180A from it’s system. Is it because the TR Smart is configurable and we set it to 50/60A max incoming current? Thanks for your help on EVERYTHING!
    -Brian

    1. The Orion in the diagram is current limited to 30A; so there will only ever be a max of 30 amps flowing through that wire. That’s why that fuse (and wire) is smaller than the 180-250A fuses you’d see if you were to use a non-current-limiting device like an Isolator.

  12. Hey! Thanks so much for SO much clear and useful info! I’m in the UK and most of the wiring diagrams I’ve seen have used separate + and – bus bars with separate fuses. Is it better / necessary to use the lynx distributor – what are the advantages as it seems a huge jump in cost? Many thanks, Emma

    1. The lynx distributor is an all-in-on power distribution solution, so both of the busbars and all of the fuses are self-contained inside. It is smaller than the individual busbar solution and since the fuses attach directly to the busbar, there will be less “DC ripple” which will make the system run more efficiently and should make the components (mainly the Inverter) last longer.

      1. Nate – thanks for all the information. Is there a disadvantage to using the power in, Victron shunt and distributor. It seems that you probably don’t need the power in, especially for my system ( 300 ah battle born, 300 watt solar, shore power and 2000 multiplus). But if I did use the power in could I hook the batteries up to the terminals on the side (batteries wired in parallel) and then have my other power in items shore power and solar come from below with correct fuses – all on power in. Then the distributor is just the power going out (fuse block, etc)

        1. I mean, you CAN do whatever you like. 🙂 But… why? Using the Power-in in addition to the Distributor would just add cost and additional wiring and would take up more space. For the system you spec’d out, the diagram on this page as-is will meet your needs just fine. Also… the shore power (Inverter/Charger) and the solar charge controller also need fuses as well (as spec’d in the diagram on this page), so the power-in wouldn’t really help you.

          The Power-in is more for systems with VERY large battery banks; think 16-24 separate batteries.

          1. Ok thanks. That makes sense. Yes I would like to keep the wiring and equipment as stream lined as possible. I will just get the distributor and the shunt. Along with the 712 battery monitor do you think it is worth having the victron color control gx monitor? It is so expensive but I see quite a few people using it.

  13. Hi Nate!
    Love your awesome diagrams! I just bought the high resolution of the 220W-inverter-200-400ah-lithium-200-to 700w diagram and it is hitting almost everything I need I believe.
    First question: You do all the temperature calculations for the variations in your calculations I think I read somewhere. What temp is the lowest you use in the calcs?

    Second question: My plan would be to start with 2, 100 Ah Battleborn then get more when I can afford them, and to start with 3 Newpowa 150 Watt panels. So would I wire them the way you wired the 2, 100 Watt panels?

    Third question: If I add a 3rd battery and add a 4th 150 Watt panel, the battery is straight forward, but at that time would I need to rewire the panels on the roof the way you show I should wire 4, 100 Watt panels?

    Forth question: I am assuming that the maximum for solar panels would be 4, giving me the 600 Watts (without the complex calculations) but I could not go to 5 with this set up. Is that correct?
    THANK YOU!

    1. 1: Yes, the temperatures of the panels are taken into account to a temperature of -40.

      2: Wire the 3 panels all in series.

      3: Wire the 4 panels in series parallel with 2 pairs of 2 panels wired in series and the 2 series strings wired in parallel.

      4: You could not do 5 panels with this setup as it would require a 150V charge controller since 5 panels wired in series would exceed the 100V that the charge controller in this diagram is designed for. For more wattage/power, you’d be looking at this diagram: https://www.explorist.life/3000w-inverter-400-600ah-400-to-1200w-solar-camper-solar-kit

  14. Hi Nate,

    First off thank you so much for the content. I had a question about the fuse between the battery and busbar. I am using two separate positive and negative busbars (purchased before knowing about the lynx distributor), anyways I have a 300 amp ANL fuse that will be in between my positive battery terminal and positive busbar. Does this need to be a terminal fuse or is it okay to have the ANL fuse with two wires (one to the battery and one to the bus bar)? thank you!

  15. Hi Nate, Newpowa just discontinued their 175 Watt panels and will be carrying 180 Watt panels in a couple weeks. I like their frames but instead of 4 panels delivering 700 Watts it would be 720 Watts. I am not sure I could do the math you do without error; would this build (2000W INVERTER | 200-400AH LITHIUM | 200 TO 700W SOLAR CAMPER WIRING DIAGRAM) still work with 720 Watts or must I look for other panels or scale up to your 3000W inverter design? $$

  16. Hi Nate, great diagram! I’m just embarking on my van build and was looking at your old version of this diagram. I was wondering what the advantage of the batter to batter charger is? Is it just more efficient? Also, could you save yourself wiring the negative from the alternator to the BtoB charger by connecting both to the chassis? If not, why? Thanks!

  17. Hey Nate. I had commented on one of the pages on the site here and can’t seem to find it. I’m bookmarking is Page hoping that I will come back and see if you have commented. First I want to thank you for your amazing knowledge and helpful hints. The system I have are four panels at 330 watts of peace with a 2000 watt 24 volt inverter with 3 Nissan Leaf generation 2 60 amp hour apiece batteries with a 40 amp renogy charge controller. I hope 2000 watt inverter will be enough. And is taking all my DC Outlets and putting them on a DC breaker really necessary? Again thanks a bunch Nate.

    1. Yes, each wire going to a DC outlet must be protected by a fuse in the fuse block. The wire going to the fuse block must be protected by a fuse/breaker as well (a fuse in the case of this diagram).

  18. Nate, So I started my electrical late last year and got shut down by winter weather. Back at it now and I am following your new and improved version. My question is I have already run 2/0 wire from the auto batteries to what will be my Victron B2B smart controller. The problem is the 2/0 wire will not readily fit into the lugs in the Victron. Any idea on how I can reduce that 2/0 wire so that it will connect?? Any help would be appreciated. Also the ground for the Inverter is now 2/0 going to the busbar?? Thanks again for your hard work.

  19. Hi Nate,
    I’m going with this setup using a single 200ah Victron battery.
    Do you still recommend 300 Amp ANL fuse from Battery bank to Busbars, or should I go lower?

    Thanks,
    Orri

  20. Hi Nate,

    I’m planing on installing your 400AH setup exactly like your very well put together diagram, which I purchased. Should I buy the semi complete package you have on battle born web site and get the rest off of Amazon? OR? I thought you had a way to add the whole list to my cart on Amazon?

    1. Hey Leif! You should use the “CAMPER SOLAR PARTS SHOPPING LIST” in addition to whatever solar parts you need from the dropdowns at the bottom of this blog post as your shopping list guide. Not everything is from Amazon, so there is not an ‘add all to cart’ function.

  21. Thank for all of your help with the diagrams. In the diagram you have a 6awg wire attaced to the lower left corner of the charge controller. That wire attaches to the lower right hand corner of the inverter/charger. Next to that wire is a 2/0 wire (also attached to the lower right corner of the inverter/charger) that goes to the lynx busbar. Are these wires ground wires? I am probably over thinking, nut could you please explain.
    thanks,
    Tim

    1. Yep! Those are equipment ground wires. They connect the metal chassis of the equipment to the negative busbar so that in the event of a catastrophic equipment failure, the current has a path back to the battery to complete the circuit so the fuse can blow.

    1. Between the solar array and the MPPT is simply a dual pole, DC rated breaker which is acting ONLY as a disconnect and does not offer any kind of overcurrent protection. Overcurrent protection in this location is not required. More info: https://www.explorist.life/how-to-fuse-a-solar-panel-array-and-why-you-may-not-need-to/

      The dual pole disconnect just needs to be big enough to handle the array amperage, which is why I have a 40-50A breaker in that location. This disconnect is required by NEC 690.17 (B)

  22. Hi there Nate – With a system like this, is it worth it to connect a travel trailer (towable) to the vehicle alternator via a 7-pin connector? Do you have a diagram that shows that kind of setup? If I decide to eliminate an alternator connection from this diagram, what equipment changes and do you already have a diagram like that? Thanks so much – love the work you’ve done here.

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